Winter Viking Wedding Shoot- Stellar Weddings

The island of Tasmania is full of incredible yet undiscovered creatives. This styled winter shoot coordinated by Stellar Weddings shows just that. No amount of snow turned these guys off, and we are thrilled to share this styled shoot with you.

By Stellar Weddings

When the idea of “Winter Viking Wedding” came to the girls at Kingbilly Flora, they knew it would be the opportunity of a lifetime to create a scene that showed just how incredible some of these undiscovered creatives were and thus these images were born. Kingbilly Flora created floral arrangements solely with dried flowers. The creative points for the pieces in this shoot were “Fierce and Bold Ruler”. They wanted to created pieces that made the couple Feel what they needed to project. 

 Tasmania has some of Australia’s best photographers. The scenery on this bountiful island is muse to our incredible artists behind the camera. But when it came to choosing a photographer for this shoot, only one came to mind. Otherwise known as “snow child” Shirley Bliss started as a Commercial Photographer specialising in food photography in the local restaurant scene. Her ability to evoke emotions through inanimate objects led her to pursue Wedding photography. Where there’s passion, she will make you feel it. And that’s exactly what she did in this shoot. Shirley now photographs a combination of multiple genres that she has accumulated through her photography journey. Food, fashion and passion, she can capture it all and give you all the feels.

With so many wedding boutiques across Tasmania it was difficult to choose a dress we knew would “fit the bill” but after a lot of research we came across a boutique that we couldn’t go past. A local fashion boutique- Strutt Design Studio. They  specialise in bridal and formal wear. When we told Strutt about this collaboration they were on board straight away and without so much as a conversation they knew they had the perfect dress to fit the scene and that they did. Every element of this dress was perfect for this shoot. 

The make up was created by Tanisha Koops. Tanisha needed no guidance. In the door at 7am on the day of the shoot, having never met, she made us feel so confident in her ability to create the look that was needed. “Fierce” was the word she gave us and we agreed. Within an hour she had our bride looking like the most Boss bride you’d ever seen. 

You can’t have a Viking wedding without Viking armour, right? The props were handcrafted by a local Dad & Daughter team- Victor and Elisabeth Soo. They create props with foam: otherwise known as the “Foamsmith”  these incredible pieces looked the part with unbelievable attention to detail. They were everything we dreamed of and more. 

Finally, the couple. Toby and Esther Long. Both medical professionals, they share not only their work space but the most intense passion for each other both on and off camera. These guys had us feeling all kinds of emotions! Although this wasn’t their actual wedding, you would never have guessed it. Their love for each other just as strong as the day they said “I do” over three years ago. If you love a good Nicholas Sparks movie, you’d love this couple! 

 

Social Media Handles:

Photography: @Stellar.weddings 

Dress: @Struttdesign

Make-up: @Tanishakoops 

Concept & Flowers: @Kingbillyflora Props: @Makeroos 

Models: @Esthermlong & @toobyl

Stories Within Stories: With Nina Hamilton

Tasmanian wedding photographer Nina Hamilton is one adventurous lady. A seeker of stories, she writes from the heart about personal bravery, the power in being present, and learning how not to be your own worst critic. 

We comprise many stories; we collect them in the everyday with each experience, interaction and conversation. We carry them with us as memories, as scars, as badges of honour. Your wedding day becomes a significant part of your story; it is a celebration of a threshold, or intersection, from one part of your story to the next. And it’s a story that deserves to be told.  

I tell stories with a camera. I consider myself an observer of people and life; a seeker of stories. I seek moments and stories in the ordinary, the everyday and the in-between – the best stories lie in the unexpected snippets of life. Visual storytelling is a skill I’ve refined through a combination of travel, people-watching and street photography. I compliment this by drawing on my background in architecture to inform the way I see and use elements such as light + shadow, pattern, texture, lines, form and colour.

I definitely never intended to photograph people and make visual stories. I was about 7 when got my first camera and started telling half-stories; by half, I mean that most of the people in my photos had no heads and were unidentifiable. At school, I wanted to be a journalist. I had my sights set on being a foreign correspondent, collecting stories of human experience from some crazy corners of the earth. But my involvement in the Port Arthur Massacre in 1996 and watching the way the media worked made me realise that I didn’t have it in me to elicit stories from people who were grieving or under distressing circumstances. Instead, I ended up studying architecture and developed an interest in humanitarian design. This lead me to volunteer and work in India, South Africa and Uganda. It was during my 2 years living in Uganda, and traveling East Africa, that I learnt to photograph people. I undertook a pro-bono documentary project in Myanmar in 2018 which finally brought together my love of architecture and photojournalism; and took me out of my comfort zone.

In the creative fields, it’s easy to become comfortable, even complacent, with your process and output, and become static. Pushing yourself out of your comfort zone, broadening your knowledge and skills, and learning from others in your industry is essential for professional and personal development. Most of us are visual learners, so workshops are perfect learning tools.

When I signed up for the EXSPD Adventures at Mt Hotham earlier this year, it looked like a pretty straightforward workshop, with the promise of “photography, adventure, hiking, fires, beers and good vibes”. Sure, I hung out with a bunch of incredible photographers and speakers, drank beer (and gin), took photos in the most amazing light (yes, lightgasms are real) and learnt a few tips from the pros. However, the workshop far exceeded everyone’s expectations. And some of us took away personal stories.

 

I had no idea that my time on the mountain would become a very personal, and crucial, turning point. It began with an unexpected conversation, on the first afternoon, with Si Moore (Bayly & Moore). We discussed my architectural and design roots and I mentioned that I was hesitant to share most of my work. I have a lot of work that I don’t share; I’m my own worst critic and I fear it’s not enough. Part of me knows this is absolute bollocks, but my anxiety always screams louder and overrules the rational voice in my head. Even though I’m creating images for others, I still find it a very personal process; and I’m apprehensive about how others will view them. The conversation took a sharp turn:

Si: Show me something interesting plz.
Nina: Here, look.
Si: Holy fuck, just do that forever.
Nina: K, bye.
Si: What just happened. AMAZE. *eats cold pie*

In the days that followed, I did a lot of observing and listening and, as a result, I made some stuff that I had no idea I was capable of making (even though it has been in me all along). I was finding traces of architecture throughout the wild landscape and (finally) drawing upon the plethora of architectural knowledge that was once second nature to me (light/shadow/lines/pattern/texture) when composing photos. I had misplaced that intuition.

Then, on the top of Mt Hotham on the last night of the workshop, when the light was singing the most beautiful arias, I had an ‘ah ha!’ moment. I realised that it was the first time I had felt completely present for almost 6 years. I realised that I had finally been shooting with more purpose and intention than I had since I was in Africa. I realised that I wasn’t second-guessing myself. It was moment of clarity and a bloody magical feeling.

Postnatal depression is a bitch and for a long time, I wasn’t ok. It has become a big part of my own story and has taken me to some pretty dark places – most days it was a struggle to breathe and I felt completely numb to feeling very much at all. I also lost touch with my own identity. When the depression started to lift, anxiety slipped into the cracks. I still carry this anxiety with me. It was through hearing the personal stories of the speakers (and some of the participants) at the workshop that I was able to finally find my voice to share my own story. I don’t talk about it often; but seeing the vulnerability of those people in the industry who we often hold up as ‘invincible’ flicked something within me. 

We are all human, with human stories and human experiences. We are all imperfect, which makes us ‘us’. We are simultaneously strong and vulnerable, and we feel more feelings than we could ever name. I feel a lot of things and some days anxiety still gets the better of me. But we can turn our own stories and experiences into how we collect others’ stories. My experience with PND and anxiety allows me to be the calming voice when someone is on edge or nervous on a wedding day. It has made me more aware of noticing the most fleeting and quiet moments that might otherwise be missed. It is also the main reason why I believe in a people-first approach to wedding photography –  people, human connections and in-between moments first; the material details help tell the story, but they are not the most important part.

 

I want to make people feel in their hearts by seeing visual stories with their eyes. I want to document stories as they unfold in front of me. I want to visually narrate the realness of your day, creating beautifully honest stories of love and human connection. You see, you’ll want to look back on your wedding day – your story – and feel the words spoken, the deep belly laughs, the safe embraces, the gentle kisses, the stolen glances, and hilarious and heart-warming speeches. Because this is the stuff that’s at the very heart and soul of your celebration. 

Every wedding story is different; you’re unique and your relationship is as well. Your photos should be a real representation of who you are, your love and your togetherness. I want to tell your story in a way that feels true to you.

And the moral of this story? Be brave and put forward more work. Starting right now, by sharing my story.

 

 

New Era for Pure Bride

Well, it’s been an exciting couple of months as Pure Bride transitioned to new management!

We have been working tirelessly to get up to speed and put together a 2019 offering for our vendors, and couples! Our Expo and Magazine are scheduled for the 20th of October 2019, and we couldn’t be more excited for the year to come.

We will be refreshing the brand, introducing a heap more online content and material, as well as curating jaw-dropping and inspiring editorial features for our annual publication. We are adding new vendors to our online directory, and looking out for the best new wedding suppliers to feature as part of Pure Bride. Our media kit will be uploaded shortly through our Vendors page.
We thank you immensely for your patience over this period, and looking forward to a great year for Pure Bride.

Love,
Anna
New Director & Managing Editor
xx

Behind the scenes: Staff Makeup by Hannah Nugent

The staff photoshoot last year at Westland Nurseries with Jessica Turale was a cracker of a day! Squeezed in between shots of bridal-clad guys and gals, we managed to gather the crew together for a few photos with our chosen ‘spirit plants’.

Our yearly major shoot is an extraordinarily busy day, and with organising a large troupe of models (hair, makeup, location and art direction) we never get the chance to concentrate on our own beautiful selves. The annual staff photos usually consists of us running to the nearest bathroom to tuck away the stray hairs and apply a bit of lippy, at least for those of us who are there all day.

Luckily for us, one of our models this year just so happens to be a beauty therapist. The gorgeousness that is Hannah Nugent started her day even earlier than early, meeting us at the office with her enormous supply of beautification goodies. She did a stellar job making the Pure Bride management team look like actual human beings and we love her to bits for it. Thanks so, so much Hannah!

Hannah does some gorgeous nails as well as makeup! If you’d like to enquire after her services, she can be contacted on hannah.nugent2@facebook.com.

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The lovely Hannah, with her own makeup done on the expo day by Claire Hunt Makeup Artist. We were extremely lucky to have Hannah helping us out at the expo, too!

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Girls Day Out Expo

We had a great time supporting the Cancer Council this weekend at the Girls Day Out Expo in Princes Wharf Shed One! It happened to coincide beautifully with the launch of our brand new online store, so the first part of the weekend was spend getting our stock ready and framing some prints!





The expo itself was a great day filled with sun, laughs and lots of lovely people. Our booth was stationed between two of our own Pure Bride vendors, Lucid Photography and Style My Day, and it was great to see some familiar smiling faces!

We had a completely fantastic response to our new products and loved chatting to people about the current and upcoming issues of Pure Bride Magazine. Only five months to go until our own expo at PW1, we can’t wait! x










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